Our hands-on reviews put 32 video baby monitors to the test, examining their features, image clarity (day and night vision), convenience, reliability, safety, the range of reception, and versatility. We came away with over 15 of the top baby monitors of the year, including the top-ranked Infant Optics monitor to the super versatile Project Nursery monitor.

We began by shopping for baby monitors like anyone else would if they had dozens of hours to do it. The process started with a long list of best sellers at Amazon, Walmart, Target, BuyBuy Baby, and Costco. We found monitors recommended in editorial reviews, such as from PCMag, Reviewed, and Tom’s Guide. We also read a ton of discussion among parents in the Amazon reviews—what features they found especially useful, and what problems tend to occur. Thinking of all of this, and comparing those concerns against the things we’ve appreciated and despised in our own years of monitor use, we developed the following selection criteria:
Why spend money on a baby monitor, which serves a single specific purpose, when you could use an indoor home-security camera that you can repurpose once your kid leaves the nursery? We wondered the same thing, so along with with dedicated video baby monitors, we tested a Nest Indoor Cam, currently among our top-rated wireless home security cameras.
With more than 24,000 Amazon reviewers giving this monitor a near five-star rating, we’re proud to include the Infant Optics DXR-8 video baby monitor on our list of best baby monitors. Parents rave about its crystal-clear picture in both light and darkness, and the interchangeable wide-angle lens for larger viewing areas (sold separately). Not only that, the DXR-8 has the ability to pan and zoom across baby’s room without parents having to enter the room and move or adjust the camera. We think these features make the Infant Optics DXR-8 the best video baby monitor.
Receiving four out of five stars based on almost 400 Amazon customer reviews, the FBM3501 boasts of a price competitive with the Infant Optics DXR-5 (see below). It has features found only in much more expensive baby monitors such as a PTZ camera, two-way talkback capability and a built-in temperature monitor. It even includes optional alerts such as a feeding timer.
But, for many parents, a baby monitor is a part of daily life. A baby monitor gives you a camera and/or microphone near the crib, and a separate rechargeable parent unit (aka, a monitor) that connects wirelessly and can travel with you throughout the house, either working while plugged in or running off its battery. It's nice to see your children in bed, dreaming happily, sleeping in adorable new positions, cuddling with animals, and generally doing okay.
Video is streamed wirelessly in real time to a slim 3.5-inch LCD color display module, providing a crystal-clear image without grainy or pixelated images. There’s a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission that provides both privacy and delay-free video and audio feedback. The monitor system has a portable power source that lasts an average of 10 hours in power saving mode, and six hours with the display screen constantly on. It can be charge anywhere that has a USB import, such as laptops or desktop computers.

As much as new parents want to be in the room with baby at all times, sometimes a baby monitor is necessary (like when you’re having a dinner party — or just want to watch Insecure in the next room). To help navigate the vast, confusing universe of baby monitors, we spoke to Lauren Kay, the Bump’s deputy editor, and Dave Baldwin, Fatherly’s former gear-and-tech editor and current play editor, about their recommendations, from traditional video monitors to smart-tech-enabled devices that can even track how your baby is sleeping. Add one of these to the baby registry.
The Babysense monitor features a 2.4-inch HD LCD screen with high-quality video transmission up to 900 feet. Features to keep you better connected to your baby include infrared night vision, 2x digital zoom, pan and tilt, temperature alerts if it’s too hot or cold and two-way talkback. It also has multi-camera expandability with the ability to incorporate three additional cameras (sold separately). This monitor doesn't alert you to your baby's activity, but it does indicate connectivity and battery problems, and you can set reminder alarms for feeding times, etc.

This is our favourite audio monitor due to the strong signal coverage and battery life – which easily lasts a day – and the fact that it still works after being knocked, bumped or dropped. You can chat to your baby when you’re not in the room and there are a lot of features for the price, including temperature display, nightlight, paging feature, warning light for low battery or poor range and belt-clip so you can wear your monitor. Unlike with many monitors, there’s no interference from other devices, although we found we had to have the volume on high at all times and if there’s background noise going on, the clarity isn’t quite as good.
The Nest Cam isn’t a dedicated baby monitor, but an all-around home protection device. Besides aiming the camera at the crib, you can also use it to keep an eye on the nanny, the dog or your empty home while you’re away. The video camera can be set up anywhere, and you can watch the live streaming from your smartphone. It also has two-way communication so you can soothe your little one to sleep, even if you’re offsite. If the device senses motion or sound, it’ll send a phone alert or an email to you. Missed what happened? From the app, you can view photos of any activity that took place over the last three hours. (There are Nest Aware subscriptions available that provide access to 5, 10 or 30 days of recordings, for $5, $10 or $30 a month, respectively). The picture quality is super sharp, too.
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