Claiming to be the “first-ever monitor with interchangeable optical lens capability,” allowing customizable viewing angle and zoom, the DXR-8 represents a big leap in features — and price — from the reliable Infant Optics stalwart DXR-5 model. It has a larger (3.5 inch/9 cm) full color LCD display monitor compared to the DXR-5 (at 2.4 inch/6 cm) monitor screen. There is also an optional wide angle lens sold separately. The remote PTZ camera is also a step above the DXR-5 camera. The DXR-8 is commended for its ultra-long battery life — 10 hours on power-saving mode and 6 hours with screen on — which far outlasts most competitors’ products.
Watch your little one fall asleep on our high quality 2.8” video baby monitor screen. You’ll never miss a moment with the remote control pan and tilt function so you can change the angle of the camera from the comfort of your sofa. And with night vision you can still keep an eye on your little one even when the lights are down. Rest at ease with our temperature display feature, which will alert you if your babies room is too hot or cold. With five lullaby’s to choose from sooth your little one to asleep. And when you’re not in the room the two way communication talk back feature keeps your baby and you connected.
The Infant Optics DXR-8 has superior battery life to any of the other video monitors we tested, as well as a simpler monitor interface that’s more intuitive and easier to navigate than those found on competitors. The range, image quality, price, and many other features are comparable to those of the best competitors. Other good qualities include its basic-but-secure RF connection, and ability to pair multiple cameras, but those are features common to several other baby monitors. Every baby monitor has its share of negative feedback, but among more than 24,000 Amazon reviews, the complaints about the Infant Optics are relatively mild.
Range: Range is the main drawback of an RF model, as audio monitors can roam farther out, and a Wi-Fi connection can theoretically be checked anywhere. We wanted an adequate range for a typical home—to be able to maintain a signal up or down a flight of stairs, across the house, and out on a patio or driveway, but we didn’t expect much beyond that. We zeroed in on monitors rated to about 700 feet of range or greater.1
Technology has changed the way parents monitor their babies. With today’s audio and video, parents can keep an ear peeled and an eye out for the most subtle changes in their little ones. Whether you want to simply hear your baby’s first cry or you’re looking for a high-tech video monitor with a sleep sensor, there’s a baby monitor out there for you.
If you’ve put your little one down for a nap then our range of BT audio baby monitors will alert you if they need you. With a choice of 18 different soothing lullabies to choose from to help them drift off to sleep, you can even control the temperature and project a wonderful lightshow onto the ceiling. You can then listen out for any signs of distress through the wireless receiver.
The price of the Infant Optics, about $150 at the time of writing, is on the higher end for baby monitors. As much as we wanted to recommend a more affordable video monitor, we found their shortcomings to be major enough—terrible video quality and poor connections were common—that we couldn’t recommend one. The Infant Optics offers a better value even though it’s among the more expensive options available. Many people use these daily for years, which helps justify the investment, and the reports of reliable customer service from other owners are reassuring. If you have to spend less, go audio-only.
Just because you’re pulling double diaper duty doesn’t mean you need to buy two baby monitors. If you’re a twin mom, simply look for a monitor that can accommodate add-on cameras. The Babysense Video Monitor comes with two digital cameras right out of the box (and can handle up to four), making this the best baby monitor for twins. With the push of a button, you can toggle between views of your twin babes. Plus, this monitor features digital pan/tilt and zoom, two-way communication, room temperature monitoring and a 900-foot range.
If you’re looking to spend under $100 on a video monitor, Baldwin recommends the Babysense baby monitor as a solid budget pick. For $75, it comes equipped with a 2.4-inch HD LCD color screen, secure interference-free connection and 2.4 GHz digital wireless transmission, two-way intercom, digital zoom, infrared night vision, room-temperature monitoring, and more.

I have purchased SO MANY monitors, and this is the one we're keeping! We tried AngelCare, Summer Infant, and VTech monitors (multiple models), and the signal wouldn't quite reach from the nursery to our bedroom with any of them. This one not only reaches with a strong signal, but it even works on our patio outside! No bells and whistles like some of the others (no wide angle lens, picture quality isn't crystal clear), but it has everything that was important to me (temperature sensor, sound-activated mode, long range, talk feature). Added bonus - it's super lightweight and thin, so traveling with it will be so easy!
I was either going to buy a Pi or Arduino, and Pi won the contest. The Raspberry pi stood out because it supports the ability to be a low power computer. Needless to say it's comparing a micro-controller development board with a fully capable computer. Add a Samsung Pro SDHC card and it's ready to go. I currently use mine to run XBMC for Pi; streaming videos from my NAS, Pandora Radio, and all the "freebee" add-ons available for multimedia. It runs 1080p movies just fine with some fine tweaking of the multipliers. HDMI is great, because I don't need a separate audio connection. I can even control my Pi with my Samsung's TV remote, because XBMC supports the HDMI-CEC. The included clear case is great because it protects my Pi, and all of the LED indicators line up perfectly when everything is snapped into place. The adapter is

Using the speaker, you can tell the Project Nursery camera to pan and tilt, play a lullaby, check the temperature in the nursery and more. You can do all this from any room that has an Alexa-powered speaker, so that you don't need to enter the nursery and risk waking up your sleeping baby. If you already own an Echo speaker, Project Nursery sells the Alexa-enabled camera on its own.
Wireless systems use radio frequencies that are designated by governments for unlicensed use. For example, in North America frequencies near 49 MHz, 902 MHz or 2.4 GHz are available. While these frequencies are not assigned to powerful television or radio broadcasting transmitters, interference from other wireless devices such as cordless telephones, wireless toys, computer wireless networks, radar, Smart Power Meters and microwave ovens is possible.

If you opt for a Wi-Fi video baby monitor, you'll need a strong internet connection, because if your internet fails, so does your baby monitor. These baby monitors operate like your average smart home security camera from Nest, Canary, or others. You connect the camera to your Wi-Fi network, and then you can access live video anywhere on your computer, smartphone, or tablet. Many of these types of cameras offer encryption and other high-tech security features.
Project Nursery offers a variety of monitor options that include fantastic features like remote camera control, two-way communication, motion, sound and temperature alerts and the ability to play white noise or lullabies. But what we like best about this one is that it comes with a traditional 5-inch screen monitor and a 1.5-inch mini video monitor that you can wear like a bracelet. Both monitors have a long battery life, too.
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